Wednesday, 31 October 2012

Online bullying exposes children to dangers beyond the schoolyard

Online bullying exposes children to dangers beyond the schoolyard

ANALYSIS: Cyberbullying happens in unsupervised spaces where normal social rules are suspended
THE TRAGIC death by suicide of 13-year-old Erin Gallagher in Donegal last weekend forces us, yet again, to question how we manage the complex issue of cyberbullying.
Bullying is fundamentally about exerting power and control and there will always be young people who want to deliberately hurt others because of their own personal unhappiness, jealousy or low self-esteem.
Research shows that boys tend to be more overtly physical in their bullying, whereas girls use more emotional and psychological bullying: snide comments, exclusion, undermining, etc...

Wednesday, 24 October 2012

Immigrants needed for economic health

Immigrants needed for economic health

Immigrants are crucial to the State’s economic future, a report to be published this evening argues.

The report, Migrants and the Irish Economy, commissioned by the Integration Centre, says not only has Ireland benefited from inward migration over the past 15 years, but with some supports immigrants could be key to the country flourishing again. It says the State will continue to need migrant labour, and migrants are vital to sectors needing language proficiency and technical skills...

Saturday, 20 October 2012

Wednesday, 17 October 2012

IPS Spotlight Photos

Elephants in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are in danger of being culled. Credit: Malini Shankar/IPSMinati Sen is happy with her floating farm. Credit: Naimul Haq/IPSBijoy Kumar Sen rows out to his floating farm with his family. Credit: Naimul Haq/IPSPolice detained several Kashmiri juveniles for stone-pelting in the 2010 unrest. Credit: Sana Altaf/IPSThe fallen water tower in Kilinochchi is a sign of 25 years of conflict. Credit: Amantha Perera/IPS.Vilma Matías weaving at the Lucanamarca workshop. Credit: Milagro Salazar/IPS
Mountain vegetation on Pico de Orizaba, Mexico. Credit: Mauricio Ramos/IPSFarmers fear that their produce will not be able to compete with those by EU subsidised farmers. Credit Wambi Michael/IPSTurkana Women in Kenya. Less than half of all Kenyan women give birth in a medical facility. Credit: Isaiah Esipisu/IPSWith their rights now on the backburner, Palestinians in Gaza look to tunnels as their only effective outlet to the world. Credit: Eva Bartlett/IPS.Taliban who surrendered with their weapons to the Pakistan army in August. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSChildren from families displaced by the drought line up to receive food at a feeding centre in Mogadishu. Credit: Abdurrahman Warsameh/IPS
All that Alybe Nally has left to walk in. Credit: Karlos Zurutuza/IPS.A vegetable vendor in Bangalore using a solar lamp to light her stall. Credit: SELCO/IPSA rural school in Nicaragua. Credit: Oscar Navarrete /IPSLos pueblos plantadores de papas del Cusco notan los cambios de temperatura en las zonas altas. Crédito: Milagros Salazar/IPSStanzin Dolma of Choglamsar-Leh breaks down while showing the ruins of her home, wrecked by the August floods and landslides. / Credit:Athar Parvaiz/IPSAfrican oil palm plantations in the state of Pará. Credit:Mario Osava/IPS
Like these newly born twins, more children are born daily into families who can barely afford to raise a child. / Credit:Zofeen Ebrahim/IPSNerlande Nazaire says she has a child with a U.N. peacekeeper, who sends money regularly. Credit: Ansel Herz/IPSA Tibetan woman in Zhong Lu village, in China's western Sichuan province. Credit: Mitch Moxley/IPSFishermen's boats on the Mekong River in northern Laos. Credit: Irwin Loy/IPS.Farmer Paradza and employee / Credit: Stanley Kwenda/IPSResidents of Camp Imakile and others protest outside the prime minister's office in October 2010. Credit: Ansel Herz/IPS

IPS – China Wants Peace in Africa | Inter Press Service

IPS – China Wants Peace in Africa | Inter Press Service

BISHOFTU, Ethiopia, Oct 13 2012 (IPS) - China could soon expand its involvement in peace and security issues in Africa, according to government officials, researchers and academics from both the Asian giant and resource-rich continent who met at the second China-Africa Think Tanks Forum in Ethiopia from Oct. 12 to 13.
Mulugeta Gebrehiwot, the director of the Institute of Peace and Security Studies in Ethiopia that organised the forum, told IPS that it should not come as a surprise that China is interested in peace and security on the African continent.
“There is nothing that is not touched by peace and security. Whether you’re (looking) for investment collaboration, economic operation or anything else. Peace and security has to be in place. Because that’s the central instrument that keeps the environment for any other interaction and collaboration together,” Gebrehiwot said.

A readers' guide to learning Chinese

A readers' guide to learning Chinese

Do you want to learn Chinese? You do if you know just how important the language is going to be in your future. Here’s how to get started

ARE WE ALL TRYING TO LEARN CHINESE?
We should hope so. China could soon overtake the US as the world’s largest superpower. Across Ireland, students are getting ready for a sea change in global politics. Chinese language and culture are set to form a core part of the overhauled Junior Cert syllabus (see panel). Minister for Education Ruairí Quinn has also announced plans to offer Chinese as a Leaving Cert subject. University College Dublin and University College Cork already offer undergraduate and postgraduate degrees with Chinese language and cultural components...