Tuesday, 20 November 2012

'Diabesity' the new big thing

'Diabesity' the new big thing

We are heading towards an epidemic of diabetes that threatens to bankrupt our healthcare systems
The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide. In Ireland the latest figures by the Institute of Public Health showed that in 2010 more than 10 per cent of adults aged 55 and over have diabetes. More than 41,000 (2.7 per cent) adults aged 45 years and over have undiagnosed diabetes. Diabetes is also more common among older people.
The cause of this is very clear. We are becoming increasingly obese as a population, and the relationship between obesity and diabetes is well established. In fact, the term “diabesity” has been coined to link the relationship between increasing obesity and associated type 2 diabetes.
Some 90 per cent of the world’s 285 million people with diabetes have type 2 which is directly related to obesity. Richard Schulze of the Schulze Diabetes Institute in the US said “the increasing prevalence of obesity – fuelled by excessive calorie intake, suboptimum dietary quality and sedentary lifestyles – is driving this epidemic”...

Monday, 19 November 2012

5 times more girls drive than cycle to school | Irish Examiner

5 times more girls drive than cycle to school | Irish Examiner

The country’s leading expert on obesity has revealed that five times more schoolgirls drive to school than ride a bicycle.  With a quarter of all three-year-olds classed as obese, consultant endocrinologist, Professor Donal O’Shea, who features in the RTÉ series The Obesity Clinic, has warned a generation of parents could end up burying their children in the future...

Thursday, 15 November 2012

‘Don’t use tragedy as reason to legislate’ | Irish Examiner

‘Don’t use tragedy as reason to legislate’ | Irish Examiner

Catholic groups and high-profile campaigners against legalising abortion have hit out at the circumstances which allegedly led to the death of Savita Halappanavar.
However, despite the outrage over what happened, the same individuals insist the case should not be seen as an argument to legislate for the practice in this country.

Senator Rónán Mullen, Catholic Comment, and the Life Institute all made near identical comments in relation to the incident.

Mr Mullen said: "According to Medical Council guidelines, widely accepted medical practice and Irish law, a woman in Ms Halappanavar’s situation is entitled to the medical treatment she needs.

"A primary issue in this case may have been the diagnosis and management of infection. But there would be no good legal or ethical reason why an induced delivery could not have taken place, once the medical situation called for that."

He said it was "regrettable" that some people were seeking to use this tragedy as an argument for legislating for the Supreme Court decision the in X case. "There is no legal impediment to offering all necessary medical treatment to pregnant women."

Thursday, 8 November 2012

The Responsibility to Protect | Think Africa Press

7: The Responsibility to Protect | Think Africa Press

Africa has a long history of being 'protected' by the West. And today, with the precipitous rise of the so-called Responsibility to Protect (R2P), it appears that intervention in the name of protecting Africa has returned to the centre of Western concern – or regained its utility. Three-quarters of the crises in which R2P has been invoked or applied have been in Africa[1], and the Special Advisor to the Secretary-General on R2P announced that “the responsibility to protect really came from Africa and the African experience”[2]. Africa also provided the military testing ground for R2P and following foreign military intervention in Libya in 2011, according to Ramesh Thakur, “R2P is closer to being solidified as an actionable norm”[3].
R2P’s privileged application in Africa bears comparison to the continent's experience with the International Criminal Court (ICC). Critics have argued that the Court targets Africa because it can operate there in an accountability-free zone, able to intervene in ongoing conflicts, take sides in civil wars, scuttle amnesties and peace processes, or align itself with US military forces – all without being held responsible for the consequences of its actions. But at least with the ICC, there is a concrete institution – prosecutors and judges who make statements and decisions that can be critiqued on legal, political, or moral grounds. With R2P, however, even this modicum of publicity and formalisation is absent. And this makes its expanding use in Africa all the more dangerous...

Tuesday, 6 November 2012

Africa, Sovereignty and International Law | Think Africa Press

3: Africa, Sovereignty and International Law | Think Africa Press

 Sovereignty is not solely a European invention that was extended and exported; its origins are mired in encounters with the rest of the world – a history of subjugation. This article will seek to identify key turning points in its evolution, comparing and contrasting various classic and contemporary qualities, in order to provide the necessary context in which to understand current projects in international law.

UK parents want ban on pupils leaving school at lunchtime via @independent_ie

UK parents want ban on pupils leaving school at lunchtime via @independent_ie

Parents in the UK want teachers to ban children leaving school premises at lunchtime to stop them buying unhealthy snacks or takeaways, according to newly published research.

A poll of 12,000 parents by Laca, which represents school catering managers, found 73pc of parents in favour.

Thursday, 1 November 2012

Union: Cyberbullying impossible to stamp out | Irish Examiner

Union: Cyberbullying impossible to stamp out | Irish Examiner

The union representing secondary-school teachers has insisted they are doing everything they can to tackle cyberbullying — but admits the issue is almost impossible to stamp out.
Association of Secondary Teachers Ireland assistant general secretary Moira Leydon told RTÉ Radio’s Drivetime that schools have had policies specifically targeting bullying for more than 20 years.

However, she said the development of technology in recent years has made blocking out all forms of bullying far more difficult...