Wednesday, 6 March 2013

Researchers show 'cautious optimism' on baby's HIV cure

Researchers show 'cautious optimism' on baby's HIV cure

The girl, who has not been identified and is from rural Mississippi, was born HIV positive in 2010 to a mother who herself was not diagnosed as HIV positive until she was in labour. Mothers are typically treated in advance to prevent the virus being transmitted to the baby.
The baby was treated aggressively with antiretroviral drugs at the University of Mississippi Medical Centre from about 30 hours after her birth.
Dr Hannah Gay, an associate professor of paediatrics, used drugs aimed at treating the virus in the baby, as opposed to prophylactic measures, which seek to prevent the disease infecting the baby.
No virus detected
Over the following months the virus levels in the baby rapidly declined and the virus could not be detected at all when she stopped being treated with antiviral drugs at the age of 18 months.
This is the second person to be cured after Timothy Brown, a middle-aged American living in Germany, underwent a bone marrow transplant that cured him of both leukaemia and HIV. The scientific data behind the case of the Mississippi child, now two years old, has yet to be verified by other researchers...
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