Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Coalition to launch media drive against cyberbullying

Coalition to launch media drive against cyberbullying

A national media campaign highlighting the implications of cyberbullying will form part of a Government plan to combat the problem among young people this year.
At the publication of the Government plan on bullying yesterday, Minister for Education Ruairí Quinn said for some children and young people, “bullying is a scourge that can . . . obliterate their happiness”...

Britain urged to slap tax on sugary drinks via @independent_ie

Britain urged to slap tax on sugary drinks via @independent_ie

SUGARY drinks should be subject to a new tax, which could add 20p (23c) a litre to their price, with the proceeds going towards child health, a report has urged...

Tuesday, 22 January 2013

Telly in the children's bedroom not a good idea, says new report

Telly in the children's bedroom not a good idea, says new report

Following the Christmas period, many children’s bedrooms may look like mini digital hubs, with all sorts of new televisions, tablets, laptops and smartphones in the possession of children. The debate over whether or not to have televisions in a child’s bedroom is often a personal one, with some parents deciding to allow televisions albeit with strict limits.
New research due out this month by the Pennington Biomedical Research Centre in the US has found, perhaps not surprisingly, that having a bedroom television could have a far greater impact on health and obesity levels among children than previously thought...

Is Qatar fuelling the crisis in north Mali? - MALI-QATAR - FRANCE 24

Is Qatar fuelling the crisis in north Mali? - MALI-QATAR - FRANCE 24


Oil-rich gulf state Qatar has a vested interest in the outcome of the north Mali crisis, according to various reports that have been picked up by French MPs, amid suspicion that Doha may be siding with the rebels to extend its regional influence...

Irish still donate despite recession - The Irish Times - Mon, Jan 21, 2013

Irish still donate despite recession - The Irish Times - Mon, Jan 21, 2013

Irish people are willing to consider giving more time or money to charity despite the recession, new research has found. But they are put off by bank charges, “chuggers” and chief executives’ salaries.

The study, carried out by Pathfinder Research for the Forum on Philanthropy and Fundraising, also found people prefer to give to charities that have a “tangible vision and outcome”.

Barriers to giving included financial uncertainty, bank charges, a lack of connection with the cause, and charities not being open about administration costs and chief executives’ salaries...

Sunday, 20 January 2013

In Chaos in North Africa, a Grim Side of Arab Spring - NYTimes.com

In Chaos in North Africa, a Grim Side of Arab Spring - NYTimes.com

WASHINGTON — As the uprising closed in around him, the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi warned that if he fell, chaos and holy war would overtake North Africa. “Bin Laden’s people would come to impose ransoms by land and sea,” he told reporters. “We will go back to the time of Redbeard, of pirates, of Ottomans imposing ransoms on boats.” ..

MLK Day 2013: The Meaning of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Legacy

MLK Day 2013: The Meaning of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Legacy

Before us, there were people who had already put forth their all so that we may live in a world filled with more peace and less hatred. And though evil still lives, these people knocked a huge dent in our fight for equality. Some of these men, women, and even children paid the ultimate price for their freedom, the freedom of their generation, and the freedom of generations to come. Among the countless humans of all races and creeds that worked tirelessly for equality was a man who was determined to make a change in a non-violent way. Even though evil took Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. away, his message was one of peace, togetherness, and service. This is a message that should never be forgotten...


...Dr. King spoke of togetherness and service, two things that hardly come around unless something bad happens. Why must evil come in order for good to come about? When will we begin to serve just because it's the right thing to do?...

Thursday, 17 January 2013

Gambia’s GDP among fastest growers - Economist - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia

Gambia’s GDP among fastest growers - Economist - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia

The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of The Gambia has been identified among the fastest growers and ranked fourth after Macau, Mongolia and Libya, and not among the shrinkers.
This was revealed in the publication of The Economist 5th January 2013, Economic and Financial Indicator of the world in 2013...

Monday, 14 January 2013

The Confusion of Conflict Resolution in Africa | The Africa Report.com

The Confusion of Conflict Resolution in Africa | The Africa Report.com

Stunted by their somewhat permanent conflicts, Somalia and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) still fail to make the growing list of African countries that have heaved themselves out of political gloom. One of Africa's premier social scientists, Ebrima Sall, Executive Secretary of CODESRIA, suggests that offensive firepower alone is not enough to rid Africa of its manifold conflicts.

During the months of March and April 2012 disgruntled armed groups in the north seized control of Timbuktu, Kidal and Gao, sending the Mali's army packing and leaving Islamist insurgents in control. Described as a potential jihadist haven, northern Mali has attracted a lot of international attention since early 2012 amid fears that it is en route to becoming the next Somalia, or even Afghanistan...


Read the original article on Theafricareport.com : The Confusion of Conflict Resolution in Africa | The Africa Report.com
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Pambazuka - Neo-liberal thinking and the problem of politicised ethnicity in Africa

Pambazuka - Neo-liberal thinking and the problem of politicised ethnicity in Africa

It is difficult to ignore the prejudicial origins and consequences of sentiments underpinning neo-liberal thought on Africa’s persistent ethnicity -and it’s usually supplied consensus that African politics is especially troubled by tribalism and needs a formalised think-tanked politics for its redemption. This article, in general, is a reaction towards this often unchallenged neo-liberal conception of Africa’s ‘trouble’ with a Western notion of democracy, and in particular, to an article published on the BBC’s website by Prof. Calestous Juma titled, ‘How Tribalism stunts African Democracy.’ ...

How to parent girls: my guide to health and happiness | Hadley Freeman | Comment is free | The Guardian

How to parent girls: my guide to health and happiness | Hadley Freeman | Comment is free | The Guardian

Females. Can't live with 'em, can't sustain the human race without 'em. But! You can write books about them, so they're not entirely without merit. Just a week into the new year and two well-publicised books – Leslie C Bell's Hard to Get and Steve Biddulph's Raising Girls – are about to be published, telling us what to do about these young female-type people who are, they say, deeply, deeply troubled, beset on all sides by confused cultural messages, promiscuity and eating disorders ("Lions and tigers and bears – oh my!")...

Friday, 11 January 2013

Singateh, Mam Balla set for Europe tour - Daily Observer

Singateh, Mam Balla set for Europe tour - Daily Observer

Two of Senegambia’s finest sensations are currently preparing for what could be described as another music electrifying project in their determination to better promote their career to their fans in Europe and the US.
The duo, Singateh and Mam Balla, are households names in the Gambia’s music scene. They believe this upcoming tour will further expose them as well as avail them the opportunity to make contact with producers, artistes, and movers and shakers in the world music scene.
Slated for March 2013, the tour will avail Singateh the opportunity to promote his latest ‘Mansakay’ album in Europe’s music bastions notably- Spain, Netherlands, Germany, Italy and France. The duo will then proceed to the US, where a similar promotional tour is expected to continue...

Sunday, 6 January 2013

Don't mind the mosquito in 2013 | The Africa Report.com

Don't mind the mosquito in 2013 | The Africa Report.com

Scientists across the world and in Africa are making vast advances on vaccinations and treatments for diseases like malaria and tuberculosis.

The University of Cape Town's Science Department is working on a single-dose cure for malaria that kills the parasite instantly.
It is due to complete trials of the aminopyridine-class drug in late 2013.

Read the original article on Theafricareport.com : Don't mind the mosquito in 2013 | The Africa Report.com
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Saturday, 5 January 2013

BBC News - Irish climber Ian McKeever killed on Mount Kilimanjaro

BBC News - Irish climber Ian McKeever killed on Mount Kilimanjaro

An Irish mountaineer and charity fundraiser has died while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

Ian McKeever, who was 42 and from Lough Dan in Wicklow, was leading a group of climbers when they were struck by lightning.

Mr McKeever was a leading member of the Kilimanjaro Achievers Team, a group of veteran climbers which led groups to the top of the mountain...

Wednesday, 2 January 2013

Africa Achievements: Top 5 ways the continent shone in 2012 - CNN.com

Africa Achievements: Top 5 ways the continent shone in 2012 - CNN.com

The rise of African women
This year saw three African women take on key leadership roles.
Malawi appointed a female president, Joyce Banda, as Liberia re-elected Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.
Since taking over the task of stabilizing a shaky economy, Banda has earned plaudits for financial reforms, including selling the presidential jet, downsizing the government's car fleet and cutting her own salary.
In another milestone, South Africa's Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma was inaugurated as the chief of the African Union.  The former minister took the reins of a male-dominated organization facing funding woes and challenged it to reduce its reliance on aid.  Her election could ease tensions between the body and the International Criminal Court, which also picked an African woman as its top prosecutor.
Critics have accused the court of focusing on African nations and overlooking opportunities to investigate abuses in other countries.
 
Gambian lawyer Fatou Bensouda took over as the court's top prosecutor, a move welcomed by critics as a major step in healing relations between the two organizations...

Letters: How not to protect children from abuse | Society | The Guardian

Letters: How not to protect children from abuse | Society | The Guardian

Your report (Child A&E visits logged in bid to expose child abuse, 27 December) ignores the adverse consequences of attempting to profile parents who take their children to hospital casualty departments. Department for Education statistics show that for 2011-12 there were 42,900 children subject to a child protection plan in England – but 166,900 children and families were falsely referred to children's social care services.
For the sake of children, the unintended consequences of child protection policy should be part of the debate. This is because the risk of such an overtly suspicious database policy is that some children may never get to accident and emergency because many parents, having previously been falsely charged with child abuse, may find it difficult to approach the system in trust and confidence...