Sunday, 26 July 2015

Erin Energy commences survey of Gambia’s offshore for oil – Foroyaa Newspaper

Erin Energy commences survey of Gambia’s offshore for oil – Foroyaa Newspaper


Erin Energy
Corporation
through its subsidiary Camac Energy
Gambia Limited, has commenced the shooting of a 3D seismic survey off the coast
of The Gambia. Polarcus Ltd has been contracted by the Company to carry out the
survey using the Polarcus Alima
an ultra-modern 12 streamer
3D/4D seismic vessel. The survey is expected to take approximately 50 days to
complete and will cover approximately 1,500 square kilometres on Erin Energy’s
A2 and A5 blocks...

Sunday, 19 July 2015

Asteroid with platinum core worth £3.5 trillion set to pass Earth

Asteroid with platinum core worth £3.5 trillion set to pass Earth

An asteroid believed to contain a platinum core worth £3.5 trillion is expected to pass Earth at around 10pm on Sunday, attracting the interest of asteroid-mining companies.
The platinum-filled space rock which is also thought to contain other precious materials is only around half a mile wide, but its metallic core is estimated to weigh 100 million tonnes making it hugely valuable.
Asteroid 2011 UW-158 will pass 1.5 million miles away from Earth, meaning it will be 30 times closer than our nearest planet, according to Slooh Community Observatory.
However, it will be six times further away than the moon’s orbit meaning it will be impossible to see with the naked eye.
For those who don’t own a telescope, the Slooh Observatory will be live-broadcasting the asteroid’s path online from their base in the Canary Islands...

Tuesday, 7 July 2015

Is ‘China in Africa’ something to fear? - The Washington Post

Is ‘China in Africa’ something to fear? - The Washington Post

Should the West fear China’s growing influence on the African continent? While there is no question that China and Chinese companies are changing the way African politicians seek aid and investment, the relationship between the two sides is far more complicated than simple narratives about “democracy or dictatorship” or “trade not aid” suggest. Veteran journalist Howard W. French explores this complexity in his book, “China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants are Building a New Empire in Africa.” He graciously took the time to answer my questions about the book and China’s role in Africa.

LS: Much of the discourse in American politics is that the U.S. should be afraid of China’s role in Africa because China is undemocratic or “trying to take over.” Is this a fair approach? Why or why not?

HF: I’m afraid the American discourse on China and Africa is very confused and generally not very insightful. Part of that is driven by the recent, still startled realization in this society of just how serious a competitor China is becoming, and part of that reflects the baggage of very old and nearly immutable American attitudes toward Africa, which are bound up in paternalism and in using Africa as a kind of vanity mirror to help us brighten our own self-image and feel better about ourselves....

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

Deaths of Irish Students in Berkeley Balcony Collapse Cast Pall on Program - The New York Times

Deaths of Irish Students in Berkeley Balcony Collapse Cast Pall on Program - The New York Times

BERKELEY, Calif. — They come by the thousands — Irish students on work visas, many flocking to the West Coast to work in summer jobs by day and to enjoy the often raucous life in a college town at night. It was, for many, a rite of passage, one last summer to enjoy travel abroad before beginning a career.
But the work-visa program that allowed for the exchanges has in recent years become not just a source of aspiration, but also a source of embarrassment for Ireland, marked by a series of high-profile episodes involving drunken partying and the wrecking of apartments in places like San Francisco and Santa Barbara...

Friday, 5 June 2015

Student legally changes name because it was cheaper than changing Ryanair booking

Student legally changes name because it was cheaper than changing Ryanair booking

WE’VE ALL HAD a Ryanair experience, but this student’s ordeal might just take the biscuit.
The Sun reports that Adam Armstrong, 19, was due to go on holidays with his girlfriend to Ibiza next week. His girlfriend’s stepfather booked flights with Ryanair and accidentally booked Adam’s ticket under the wrong name.
You see, Armstrong’s name on Facebook had been Adam West, in an homage to the Batman actor, which his girlfriend’s stepfather saw and assumed was his real name.
Once he became aware of the error, Armstrong attempted to change his name on the ticket, but was informed by Ryanair that it would cost him £220 to do so.
And so, he did what any rational person would do and changed his name by deed poll.
After changing his name to Adam West for free, he paid £103 for a new passport and he was sorted, meaning that changing your actual name is cheaper than amending a Ryanair booking...

Wednesday, 27 May 2015

ISS Africa | Beyond rhetoric: the role of women in sustainable peacebuilding

ISS Africa | Beyond rhetoric: the role of women in sustainable peacebuilding

"A high-level review of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolution 1325, expected to be released in October this year, provides an opportunity for policymakers to move beyond the rhetoric of gender mainstreaming and start putting words into practice. Resolution 1325 underlines the need for gender-sensitive approaches to peace and stability in post-conflict contexts.

Although the inclusion of women in peacebuilding processes has gained momentum in policy discussions over the last 15 years, the number of women in decision-making positions remains relatively small. Peacebuilding is the foundation for creating sustainable human security and equitable development in countries emerging from conflict. UNSC resolution 1325 recognises that women are disproportionally affected by conflict, and to address this, women should play a key role in achieving lasting peace after conflict..."

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

25 most DANGEROUS and STRANGEST AIRPORTS in the WORLD! Most amazing & cr...


Urgent Landing on Frozen Lake


Schools that ban mobile phones see better academic results | Education | The Guardian

Schools that ban mobile phones see better academic results | Education | The Guardian

"It is a question that keeps some parents awake at night. Should children be allowed to take mobile phones to school? Now economists claim to have an answer. For parents who want to boost their children’s academic prospects, it is no.

The effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week’s schooling over a pupil’s academic year, according to research by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

“Ill Communication: The Impact of Mobile Phones on Student Performance” found that after schools banned mobile phones, the test scores of students aged 16 improved by 6.4%. The economists reckon that this is the “equivalent of adding five days to the school year”.

The findings will feed into the ongoing debate about children’s access to mobile phones..."

Friday, 24 April 2015

End deaths on the sea by ending the wars around it - Al Jazeera English

End deaths on the sea by ending the wars around it - Al Jazeera English

"How to digest the reality of 1,500 dead migrants when most of the victims are lost to the sea; their hopes, dreams and even their names drowned with them?

Blame is of course being assigned; or rather deflected, divided, avoided. British stinginess, smugglers' greed, ISIL's savagery, European racism, the oppression of the Amazigh and the vagaries of war - each has its measure of truth. And however tragically dramatic, the present large-scale migration across the Mediterranean is only the latest in at least half a dozen cycles of mass global migration in the modern era.

Global capitalism and global war have always driven large-scale human migration..."

Monday, 20 April 2015

Farafenni identified as one of Africa’s ‘Boom Towns’ - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia

Farafenni identified as one of Africa’s ‘Boom Towns’ - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia

The town of Farafenni in the North Bank Region of the Gambia has been identified by DHL as one of Africa’s ‘boom towns’ and cities that are enjoying growth on the back of growing industries and providing opportunities for African businesses.
In a statement issued in Cape Town, South Africa, on Thursday, DHL Express Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) described Farafenni as being situated on the north bank of the Gambia River, about 120 kilometres inland from the capital Banjul.
It said the town is home to numerous banks and insurance firms and that it is experiencing fast growth mainly due to its geographical location on the main road between Dakar and Casamance (the southern area of Senegal), and its close proximity to the ferry crossing on the Gambia River...

Billion dollar ivory and gold trade fuelling DR Congo war: UN - Times LIVE

Billion dollar ivory and gold trade fuelling DR Congo war: UN - Times LIVE

"Militarised criminal groups with transnational links are involved in large-scale smuggling" of "gold, minerals, timber, charcoal and wildlife products such as ivory" of up to $1.3 billion each year from eastern DR Congo, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) said.

The revenues finance at least 25 armed groups -- but up to 49 according to some estimates -- that "increasingly fuel the conflict" in the war-torn region, the report read.

Control over the mineral-rich areas is a key factor in the conflicts that have raged in eastern DR Congo for decades.

"These resources lost to criminal gangs and fuelling the conflict could have been used to build schools, roads, hospitals and a future for the Congolese people," said Martin Kobler, UN chief in DR Congo, and head of the 20,000-strong UN peacekeeping force, MONUSCO...