Monday, 12 September 2016

Alicia Keys Quits Wearing Makeup, “I Don’t Wan’t To Cover Up Anymore”

Alicia Keys Quits Wearing Makeup, “I Don’t Wan’t To Cover Up Anymore”




"It's great to not wear makeup, but it's great to wear makeup too, if it makes you happy. If you like how you look with a full face, contour and some serious lashes, you do that, and SLAY. But if you like yourself bare-faced, go forth and slay like that too. You do you.

Alicia finished by saying, 'I don't want to cover up anymore. Not my face, not my mind, not my soul, not my thoughts, not my dreams, not my struggles, not my emotional growth. Nothing.'..."

Thursday, 1 September 2016

How Russia Often Benefits When Julian Assange Reveals the West’s Secrets - The New York Times

How Russia Often Benefits When Julian Assange Reveals the West’s Secrets - The New York Times




Julian Assange was in classic didactic form, holding forth on the topic that consumes him — the perfidy of big government and especially of the United States.

Mr. Assange, the editor of WikiLeaks, rose to global fame in 2010 for releasing huge caches of highly classified American government communications that exposed the underbelly of its wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and its sometimes cynical diplomatic maneuvering around the world. But in a televised interview last September, it was clear that he still had plenty to say about “The World According to US Empire,” the subtitle of his latest book, “The WikiLeaks Files.”

From the cramped confines of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where he was granted asylum four years ago amid a legal imbroglio, Mr. Assange proffered a vision of America as superbully: a nation that has achieved imperial power by proclaiming allegiance to principles of human rights while deploying its military-intelligence apparatus in “pincer” formation to “push” countries into doing its bidding, and punishing people like him who dare to speak the truth.

Notably absent from Mr. Assange’s analysis, however, was criticism of another world power, Russia, or its president, Vladimir V. Putin...

Thursday, 11 August 2016

10 Most Common Causes Of Fatal Aviation Accidents | Boldmethod

10 Most Common Causes Of Fatal Aviation Accidents | Boldmethod

The FAA is continuously trying to improve safety, and as part of that, they've released their top 10 causes of fatal GA accidents, with a specific accident for each type.

10) Thunderstorms Or Windshear
Weather is obviously one of the most hazardous parts of flying. This photo below is a Cessna 210 that flew into a level 6 thunderstorm. The pilot at the controls was Scott Crossfield, an accomplished Naval test pilot, and the first pilot to fly twice the speed of sound. Before he departed, he received a weather briefing, however he didn't get weather updates during his flight. The airplane broke apart in-flight, with wreckage found at three different locations.

1-animation

Tuesday, 9 August 2016

Researchers or Corporate Allies? Think Tanks Blur the Line - The New York Times

Researchers or Corporate Allies? Think Tanks Blur the Line - The New York Times



"WASHINGTON — As Lennar Corporation, one of the nation’s largest home builders, pushed ahead with an $8 billion plan to revitalize a barren swath of San Francisco, it found a trusted voice to vouch for its work: the Brookings Institution, the most prestigious think tank in the world. “This can become a productive, mutually beneficial relationship,” Bruce Katz, a Brookings vice president, wrote to Lennar in July 2010. The ultimate benefit for Brookings: $400,000 in donations from Lennar’s different divisions..."

Wednesday, 1 June 2016

7 Times ATC Is Required To Ask You For A Pilot Report | Boldmethod

7 Times ATC Is Required To Ask You For A Pilot Report | Boldmethod

We all know that it's important to give pilot reports when we can. Did you know that ATC is required to request a pilot report when the following conditions are observed or forecast? (Details Here)

1) Ceilings at or below 5,000 feet. These PIREPs shall include cloud base/top reports when feasible.
1

2) Visibility (surface or aloft) at or less than 5 miles.
3) Thunderstorms and related weather.4) Moderate or greater turbulence.
4) Moderate or greater turbulence.

4primary

...












Rat Meat (Diks), a Cure for Hypertension? | Daily Observer

Rat Meat (Diks), a Cure for Hypertension? | Daily Observer
Rat, locally called Diks, is said to be a very good local medicine for High Blood Pressure, even though most medical Doctors said they cannot confirm that claim.

We have heard many testimonies from friends and relatives that rat meat is effective for the treatment of high blood pressure; with some claiming that they have found it to be an effective palliative for arthritis. Some people from local communities have confirmed to us that the animal is a very powerful medicine for High Blood Pressure. They also told us that it has for long been used as good medicine by their forefathers, and is still benefiting them as well in various aspects.

Some people have even said that Medical Research Council MRC (Gambia Office) buys and uses ‘diks’ as a major element to cure High blood Pressure and probably other diseases. Observer Light went to the offices of the MRC in Fajara in an attempt to shed light on this matter; but the advanced health facility made it crystal clear that it has never gone into buying and using rats as a medicine to cure any disease.

by Modou Lamin Jammeh

Thursday, 19 May 2016

iPads in the classroom - transforming education or unnecessary distraction? - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

iPads in the classroom - transforming education or unnecessary distraction? - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

For the past eight months, my teenage son has been required to use an iPad for some schoolwork and much of his homework. And it seems he's not the only one; tablets are now commonplace in schools and some schools are starting to insist all pupils have one. 

But there's been little debate about this new development. And that's why the ATL teaching union commissioned a major survey on tablets in the classroom.

A total of 376 parents and teachers from across Northern Ireland responded and there was a clear consensus on a number of issues.

Most (78%) believed tablets do have at least some educational value in the classroom, but there was widespread concern about certain significant potential drawbacks.

Some 82% of respondents were worried about the 'distraction factor' if pupils were expected to use tablets for homework; will children diligently do their homework when they can check messages or play games on the same devices?

But perhaps the most alarming finding related to child protection; 64% of teaching staff who had educational experience of using tablets felt there was a risk that pupils might access inappropriate material when the devices were used in the classroom...
Acting principal Emma Quinn helps Clarke McMullan (6) use a school iPad at Rathcoole Primary School, Newtownabbey

Tuesday, 17 May 2016

Are Paper Charts Practical Anymore? | Boldmethod

Are Paper Charts Practical Anymore? | Boldmethod

You don't use typewriters anymore. Or rotary telephones. Or 8-track tapes. So when it comes to flying, why do pilots still use paper charts?

You're surrounded by technology and information everywhere you go. From the computer you work on to the smart phone in your pocket, there's more computing power within a 10-foot radius of you right now than what it took to put man on the moon.

But when it comes to navigating your plane, whether you're flying a traditional 6-pack plane or an Electronic Flight Deck, many pilots are skeptical, or downright adamant, that paper is a safer option for nav charts.

So what's the safer, and more practical option, for flying? Let's take a look at electronic charts vs. paper charts and compare the two a little more closely.
primary-image

Wednesday, 11 May 2016

Roots festival participants pay homage to Kunta Kinteh’s village - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia

Roots festival participants pay homage to Kunta Kinteh’s village - The Point Newspaper, Banjul, The Gambia





International and national participants of the ongoing International Roots Festival on Monday visited Kunta Kinteh Island in Juffureh, the native village of the most famous Gambian slave, Kunta Kinteh.

The participants visited the slave museum where most of the materials used by the slaves during the slavery days are being kept for posterity.

Kunta Kinteh Island, formerly known as James Island, was a place where thousands of slaves departed from to various parts of America or the West Indies...

Wednesday, 4 May 2016

7 Things Every Pilot Learns During Instrument Training | Boldmethod

7 Things Every Pilot Learns During Instrument Training | Boldmethod

There's nothing like popping out of the clouds, at minimums, right above the runway. Training toward your instrument rating not only makes you a safer, more confident pilot, but lets you use the full capability of the national airspace system.

Here are 7 things that you'll learn during instrument training...
1) Planning a descent, briefing an approach, and communicating with ATC, all at once, while flying partial-panel is something you'll end up getting pretty good at...

3

Monday, 25 April 2016

Obesity is the new smoking - soon governments will be forced to tackle it in the same way | Irish Examiner

Obesity is the new smoking - soon governments will be forced to tackle it in the same way | Irish Examiner

News that the global food company will advise consumers to eat certain products only “occasionally” plays havoc with the jingle that has earned its spot in the advertising slogan Hall of Fame. (Hands up all of you who can still hum the “Mars a day helps you work, rest, and play” tune that brought TV ads to life from 1959 to 1995?) Though – and here’s the unsettling bit — Mars Food isn’t telling us to eat Mars bars or indeed its Snickers bars, M&Ms, or Maltesers occasionally. It is, in fact, admitting that its pasta products and sauces — food we are likely to put on our daily dinner tables — should carry what amounts to a health warning. There’s been a rush to laud the food giant for the move, but I must be missing the point. Doesn’t anybody find it astounding that a food manufacturer is actually warning us about eating its food? You might expect to hear that its confectionery is high in sugar, salt and fat but the fact that Mars is admitting that Dolmio — “When’s your Dolmio day”, indeed? — and other sauces should be eaten, at most, once a week is hair-raising.

How did we end up here, in a world where our daily bread, so to speak, has to come with a label telling us not to eat it too often?...